Monthly Archives: November 2006

Memory Verse: Matthew 6:6

Currently I’m reading Matthew, the first book of the New Testament. I’ll be posting a verse or series of verses that I find worthy of memorization. While many people use various translations, I’m from the old school. I believe that any scripture memorization should only be from the King James Version.


  • (Matthew 6:6 KJV) But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.

    My comments: My views on this are slightly different than most peoples. I tend to view this as praying and worshiping in private, although I know scriptures also talk about being with other believers.

    Here are some excellent comments by various sources:

    Barnes states:
    Mat 6:6 –
    Enter into thy closet – Every Jewish house had a place for secret devotion. The roofs of their houses were flat places, well adapted for walking, conversation, and meditation. See the notes at Mat 9:2. Professor Hackett (‘Illustrations of Scripture,’ p. 82) says: ‘On the roof of the house in which I lodged at Damascus were chambers and rooms along the side and at the corners of the open space or terrace, which constitutes often a sort of upper story. I observed the same thing in connection with other houses.’ Over the porch, or entrance of the house, there was frequently a small room of the size of the porch, raised a story above the rest of the house, expressly appropriated for the place of retirement. Here, in secrecy and solitude, the pious Jew might offer his prayers, unseen by any but the Searcher of hearts. To this place, or to some similar place, our Saviour directed his disciples to repair when they wished to hold communion with God. This is the place commonly mentioned in the New Testament as the ‘upper room, or the place for secret prayer.

    The meaning of the Saviour is, that there should be some place where we may be in secret – where we may be alone with God. There should be some ‘place’ to which we may resort where no ear will hear us but ‘His’ ear, and no eye can see us but His eye. Unless there is such a place, secret prayer will not be long or strictly maintained. It is often said that we have no such place, and can secure none. We are away from home; we are traveling; we are among strangers; we are in stages and steamboats, and how can we find such places of retirement? I answer, the desire to pray, and the love of prayer, will create such places in abundance. The Saviour had all the difficulties which we can have, but yet he lived in the practice of secret prayer. To be alone, he rose up ‘a great while before day,’ and went into a solitary place and prayed, Mar 1:35. With him a grove, a mountain, a garden, furnished such a place, and, though a traveler, and among strangers, and without a house, he lived in the habit of secret prayer. What excuse can they have for not praying who have a home, and who spend the precious hours of the morning in sleep, and who will practice no self-denial that they may be alone with God? O Christian! thy Saviour would have broken in upon these hours, and would have trod his solitary way to the mountain or the grove that he might pray. He did do it. He did it to pray for thee, too indolent and too unconcerned about thy own salvation and that of the world to practice the least self-denial in order to commune with God! How can religion live thus? How can such a soul be saved?

    The Saviour does not specify the times when we should pray in secret. He does not say how often it should be done. The reasons may have been:

    (1) that he designed that his religion should be ‘voluntary, and there is not a better ‘test’ of true piety than a disposition to engage often in secret prayer. He intended to leave it to his people to show attachment to him by coming to God often, and as often as they chose.

    (2) an attempt to specify the times when this should be done would tend to make religion formal and heartless. Mohammed undertook to regulate this, and the consequence is a cold and formal prostration at the appointed hours of prayer all over the land where his religion has spread.

    (3) the periods are so numerous, and the seasons for secret prayer vary so much, that it would nor be easy to fix rules when this should be done.

    Yet without giving rules, where the Saviour has given none, we may suggest the following as times when secret prayer is proper:

    1. In the morning. Nothing can be more appropriate when we have been preserved through the night, and when we are about to enter upon the duties and dangers of another day, than to render to our great Preserver thanks, and to commit ourselves to His fatherly care.

    2. In the evening. When the day has closed, what would be more natural than to offer thanksgiving for the mercies of the day, and to implore forgiveness for what we have said or done amiss? And when about to lie down again to sleep, not knowing but it may be our last sleep and that we may awake in eternity, what more proper than to commend ourselves to the care of Him ‘who never slumbers nor sleeps?’

    3. We should pray in times of embarrassment and perplexity. Such times occur in every man’s life, and it is then a privilege and a duty to go to God and seek his direction. In the most difficult and embarrassed time of the American Revolution, Washington was seen to retire to a grove in the vicinity of the camp at Valley Forge. Curiosity led a man to observe him, and the father of his country was seen on his knees supplicating the God of hosts in prayer. Who can tell how much the liberty of this nation is owing to the answer to the secret prayer of Washington?

    4. We should pray when we are beset with strong temptations. So the Saviour prayed in the garden of Gethsemane (compare Heb 5:7-8), and so we should pray when we are tempted.

    5. We should pray when the Spirit prompts us to pray; when we feel lust like praying; when nothing can satisfy the soul but prayer. Such times occur in the life of every Christian, (and they are ‘spring-times’ of piety – favorable gales to waft us on to heaven. Prayer to the Christian, at such times, is just as congenial as conversation with a friend when the bosom is filled with love; as the society of father, mother, sister, child is, when the heart glows with attachment; as the strains of sweet music are to the ear best attuned to the love of harmony; as the most exquisite poetry is to the heart enamored with the muses; and as the most delicious banquet is to the hungry.

    Prayer, then, is the element of being – the breath the vital air; and, then, the Christian must and should pray. He is the most eminent Christian who is most favored with such strong emotions urging him to prayer. The heart is then full; the soul is tender; the sun of glory shines with unusual splendor; no cloud intervenes; the Christian rises above the world, and pants for glory. then we may go to be alone with God. We may enter the closet, and breathe forth our warm desires into his ever-open ear, and He who sees in secret will reward us openly.
    In secret – Who is unseen.

    Who seeth in secret – Who sees what the human eye cannot see; who sees the real designs and desires of the heart. Prayer should always be offered, remembering that God is acquainted with our real desires; and that it is those real desires, and not the words of prayer, that he will answer.

    Clarke states:
    Mat 6:6 –
    But thou, when thou prayest – This is a very impressive and emphatic address. But Thou! whosoever thou art, Jew, Pharisee, Christian – enter into thy closet. Prayer is the most secret intercourse of the soul with God, and as it were the conversation of one heart with another. The world is too profane and treacherous to be of the secret. We must shut the door against it: endeavor to forget it, with all the affairs which busy and amuse it. Prayer requires retirement, at least of the heart; for this may be fitly termed the closet in the house of God, which house the body of every real Christian is, 1Co 3:16. To this closet we ought to retire even in public prayer, and in the midst of company.

    Reward thee openly – What goodness is there equal to this of God to give, not only what we ask, and more than we ask, but to reward even prayer itself! How great advantage is it to serve a prince who places prayers in the number of services, and reckons to his subjects’ account, even their trust and confidence in begging all things of him!

    Gill states:
    Mat 6:6 – But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, Or ‘chamber’, a secret place, fit for private retirement, meditation, and prayer.

    And when thou hast shut thy door; see some such like phrases in Isa 26:20 where they are used to express security, here secrecy. Our Lord does not mean to exclude and condemn public prayer, in joining with few, or more persons, in such service; for he himself directs to it, and approves of it, Mat 8:19 but his view is to instruct persons that they should not only pray in public, but in private also; and especially the latter, which is more suitable and fitting for their particular cases, and less liable to pride, hypocrisy, and vanity.

    Pray to thy Father, which is in secret; who is invisible; not to be seen with the eyes of the body, but to be approached with a true heart, in faith and fear, through his Son Jesus Christ, the only mediator between God and man; and who is the image of the invisible God, and in whom he is pleased to manifest himself to his people, so as he does not unto the world:

    and thy Father, which seeth in secret, observes and takes notice of the secret breathings, pantings, desires, and requests of thy heart and lips,

    shall reward thee openly, both here and hereafter; by pouring into thy bosom all the good things thou hast been praying for, both for time and eternity. This is agreeable to what the Jews sometimes say,

    ‘that a man ought not to cause his voice to be heard in prayer; but should pray silently’, with a voice that is not heard; and this is the prayer which is daily accepted (g).

    Matthew Henry states:
    Mat 6:5-8 –
    In prayer we have more immediately to do with God than in giving alms, and therefore are yet more concerned to be sincere, which is what we are here directed to. When thou prayest (Mat 6:5). It is taken for granted that all the disciples of Christ pray. As soon as ever Paul was converted, behold he prayeth. You may as soon find a living man that does not breathe, as a living Christian that does not pray. For this shall every one that is godly pray. If prayerless, then graceless. ‘Now, when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are, nor do as they do,’ Mat 6:2. Note, Those who would not do as the hypocrites do in their ways and actions must not be as the hypocrites are in their frame and temper. He names nobody, but it appears by Mat 23:13, that by the hypocrites here he means especially the scribes and Pharisees.
    Now there were two great faults they were guilty of in prayer, against each of which we are here cautioned – vain-glory (Mat 6:5, Mat 6:6); and vain repetitions, Mat 6:7, Mat 6:8.
    I. We must not be proud and vain-glorious in prayer, nor aim at the praise of men. And here observe,
    1. What was the way and practice of the hypocrites. In all their exercises of devotion, it was plain, the chief thing they aimed at was to be commended by their neighbours, and thereby to make an interest for themselves. When they seemed to soar upwards in prayer (and if it be right, it is the soul’s ascent toward God), yet even then their eye was downwards upon this as their prey. Observe,
    (1.) What the places were which they chose for their devotions; they prayed in the synagogues, which were indeed proper places for public prayer, but not for personal. They pretended hereby to do honour to the place of their assemblies, but intended to do honour to themselves. They prayed in the corners of the streets, the broad streets (so the word signifies), which were most frequented. They withdrew thither, as if they were under a pious impulse which would not admit delay, but really it was to cause themselves to be taken notice of. There, where two streets met, they were not only within view of both, but every passenger turning close upon them would observe them, and hear what they said.
    (2.) The posture they used in prayer; they prayed standing; this is a lawful and proper posture for prayer (Mar 11:25, When ye stand praying), but kneeling being the more humble and reverent gesture, Luk 22:41; Act 7:60; Eph_3:14, their standing seemed to savour of pride and confidence in themselves (Luk 18:11), The Pharisee stood and prayed.
    (3.) Their pride in choosing these public places, which is expressed in two things: [1.] They love to pray there. They did not love prayer for its own sake, but they loved it when it gave them an opportunity of making themselves noticed. Circumstances may be such, that our good deeds must needs be done openly, so as to fall under the observation of others, and be commended by them; but the sin and danger is when we love it, and are pleased with it, because it feeds the proud humour. [2.] It is that they may be seen of men; not that God might accept them, but that men might admire and applaud them; and that they might easily get the estates of widows and orphans into their hands (who would not trust such devout, praying men?) and that, when they had them, they might devour them without being suspected (Mat 23:14); and effectually carry on their public designs to enslave the people.
    (4.) The product of all this, they have their reward; they have all the recompence they must ever expect from God for their service, and a poor recompence it is. What will it avail us to have the good word of our fellow-servants, if our Master do not say, Well done? But if in so great a transaction as is between us and God, when we are at prayer, we can take in so poor a consideration as the praise of men is, it is just that that should be all our reward. They did it to be seen of men, and they are so; and much good may it do them. Note, Those that would approve themselves to God by their integrity in their religion, must have to regard to the praise of men; it is not to men that we pray, nor from them that we expect an answer; they are not to be our judges, they are dust and ashes like ourselves, and therefore we must not have our eye to them: what passes between God and our own souls must be out of sight. In our synagogue-worship, we must avoid every thing that tends to make our personal devotion remarkable, as they that caused their voice to be heard on high, Isa 58:4. Public places are not proper for private solemn prayer.
    2. What is the will of Jesus Christ in opposition to this. Humility and sincerity are the two great lessons that Christ teaches us; Thou, when thou prayest, do so and so (Mat 6:6); thou in particular by thyself, and for thyself. Personal prayer is here supposed to be the duty and practice of all Christ’s disciples.
    Observe, (1.) The directions here given about it.
    [1.] Instead of praying in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, enter into thy closet, into some place of privacy and retirement. Isaac went into the field (Gen 24:63), Christ to a mountain, Peter to a housetop. No place amiss in point of ceremony, if it do but answer the end. Note, Secret prayer is to be performed in retirement, that we may be unobserved, and so may avoid ostentation; undisturbed, and so may avoid distraction; unheard, and so may use greater freedom; yet if the circumstances be such that we cannot possibly avoid being taken notice of, we must not therefore neglect the duty, lest the omission be a greater scandal than the observation of it.
    [2.] Instead of doing it to be seen of men, pray to thy Father who is in secret; to me, even to me, Zec 7:5, Zec 7:6. The Pharisees prayed rather to men than to God; whatever was the form of their prayer, the scope of it was to beg the applause of men, and court their favours. ‘Well, do thou pray to God, and let that be enough for thee. Pray to him as a Father, as thy Father, ready to hear and answer, graciously inclined to pity, help, and succour thee. Pray to thy Father who is in secret.’ Note, In secret prayer we must have an eye to God, as present in all places; he is there in thy closet when no one else is there; there especially nigh to thee in what thou callest upon him for. By secret prayer we give God the glory of his universal presence (Act 17:24), and may take to ourselves the comfort of it.
    (2.) The encouragements here given us to it.
    [1.] Thy Father seeth in secret; his eye is upon thee to accept thee, when the eye of no man is upon thee to applaud thee; under the fig-tree, I saw thee, said Christ to Nathaniel, Joh 1:48. He saw Paul at prayer in such a street, at such a house, Act 9:11. There is not a secret, sudden breathing after God, but he observes it.
    [2.] He will reward thee openly; they have their reward that do it openly, and thou shalt not lose thine for thy doing it in secret. It is called a reward, but it is of grace, not of debt; what merit can there be in begging? The reward will be open; they shall not only have it, but have it honourably: the open reward is that which hypocrites are fond of, but they have not patience to stay for it; it is that which the sincere are dead to, and they shall have it over and above. Sometimes secret prayers are rewarded openly in this world by signal answers to them, which manifests God’s praying people in the consciences of their adversaries; however, at the great day there will be an open reward, when all praying people shall appear in glory with the great Intercessor. The Pharisees ha their reward before all the town, and it was a mere flash and shadow; true Christians shall have theirs before all the world, angels and men, and it shall be a weight of glory.
    II. We must not use vain repetitions in prayer, Mat 6:7, Mat 6:8. Though the life of prayer lies in lifting up the soul and pouring out the heart, yet there is some interest which words have in prayer, especially in joint prayer; for in that, words are necessary, and it should seem that our Saviour speaks here especially of that; for before he said, when thou prayest, he here, when ye pray; and the Lord’s prayer which follows is a joint prayer, and in that, he that is the mouth of others is most tempted to an ostentation of language and expression, against which we are here warned; use not vain repetitions, either alone or with others: the Pharisees affected this, they made long prayers (Mat 23:14), all their care was to make them long. Now observe,
    1. What the fault is that is here reproved and condemned; it is making a mere lip-labour of the duty of prayer, the service of the tongue, when it is not the service of the soul. This is expressed here by two words, Battologia, polulogia. (1.) Vain repetitions – tautology, battology, idle babbling over the same words again and again to no purpose, like Battus, Sub illis montibus erant, erant sub montibus illis; like that imitation of the wordiness of a fool, Ecc 10:14, A man cannot tell what shall be; and what shall be after him who can tell? which is indecent and nauseous in any discourse, much more in speaking to God. It is not all repetition in prayer that is here condemned, but vain repetitions. Christ himself prayed, saying the same words (Mat 26:44), out of more than ordinary fervour and zeal, Luk 22:44. So Daniel, Dan 9:18, Dan 9:19. And there is a very elegant repetition of the same words, Ps. 136. It may be of use both to express our own affections, and to excite the affections of others. But the superstitious rehearsing of a tale of words, without regard to the sense of them, as the papists saying by their beads so many Ave-Marys and Paternosters; or the barren and dry going over of the same things again and again, merely to drill out the prayer to such a length, and to make a show of affection when really there is none; these are the vain repetitions here condemned. When we would fain say much, but cannot say much to the purpose; this is displeasing to God and all wise men. (2.) Much speaking, an affectation of prolixity in prayer, either out of pride or superstition, or an opinion that God needs either to be informed or argued with by us, or out of mere folly and impertinence, because men love to hear themselves talk. Not that all long prayers are forbidden; Christ prayed all night, Luk 6:12. Solomon’s was a long prayer. There is sometimes need of long prayers when our errands and our affections are extraordinary; but merely to prolong the prayer, as if it would make it more pleasing or more prevailing with God, is that which is here condemned; it is not much praying that is condemned; no, we are bid to pray always, but much speaking; the danger of this error is when we only say our prayers, and not when we pray them. This caution is explained by that of Solomon (Ecc 5:2), Let thy words be few, considerate and well weighed; take with you words (Hos 14:2), choose out words (Job 9:14), and do not say every thing that comes uppermost.
    2. What reasons are given against this.
    (1.) This is the way of the heathen, as the heathen do; and it ill becomes Christians to worship their God as the Gentiles worship theirs. The heathen were taught by the light of nature to worship God; but becoming vain in their imaginations concerning the object of their worship, no wonder they became so concerning the manner of it, and particularly in this instance; thinking God altogether such a one as themselves, they thought he needed many words to make him understand what was said to him, or to bring him to comply with their requests; as if he were weak and ignorant, and hard to be entreated. Thus Baal’s priests were hard at it from morning till almost night with their vain repetitions; O Baal, hear us; O Baal, hear us; and vain petitions they were; but Elijah, in a grave, composed frame, with a very concise prayer, prevailed for fire from heaven first, and then water, 1Ki 18:26, 1Ki 18:36. Lip-labour in prayer, though ever so well laboured, if that be all, is but lost labour.
    (2.) ‘It need not be your way, for your Father in heaven knoweth what things ye have need of before ye ask him, and therefore there is no occasion for such abundance of words. It does not follow that therefore ye need not pray; for God requires you by prayer to own your need of him and dependence on him, and to please his promises; but therefore you are to open your case, and pour out your hearts before him, and then leave it with him.’ Consider, [1.] The God we pray to is our Father by creation, by covenant; and therefore our addresses to him should be easy, natural, and unaffected; children do not use to make long speeches to their parents when they want any thing; it is enough to say, my head, my head. Let us come to him with the disposition of children, with love, reverence, and dependence; and then they need not say many words, that are taught by the Spirit of adoption to say that one aright, Abba, Father. [2.] He is a Father that knows our case and knows our wants better than we do ourselves. He knows what things we have need of; his eyes run to and fro through the earth, to observe the necessities of his people (2Ch 16:9), and he often gives before we call (Isa 65:24), and more than we ask for (Eph 3:20), and if he do not give his people what they ask, it is because he knows they do not need it, and that it is not for their good; and of that he is fitter to judge for us than we for ourselves. We need not be long, nor use many words in representing our case; God knows it better than we can tell him, only he will know it from us (what will ye that I should do unto you?); and when we have told him what it is, we must refer ourselves to him, Lord, all my desire is before thee, Psa 38:9. So far is God from being wrought upon by the length or language of our prayers, that the most powerful intercessions are those which are made with groanings that cannot be uttered, Rom 8:26. We are not to prescribe, but subscribe to God.

  • Memory Verse: Matthew 6:4

    Currently I’m reading Matthew, the first book of the New Testament. I’ll be posting a verse or series of verses that I find worthy of memorization. While many people use various translations, I’m from the old school. I believe that any scripture memorization should only be from the King James Version.


  • (Matthew 6:4 KJV) That thine alms may be in secret: and thy Father which seeth in secret himself shall reward thee openly.

    My comments: This is pretty easy to understand. Don’t give contributions to anything, then brag about it. Do it all ‘behind the scenes’, so to speak.

  • Memory Verse: Matthew 5:43-44

    Currently I’m reading Matthew, the first book of the New Testament. I’ll be posting a verse or series of verses that I find worthy of memorization. While many people use various translations, I’m from the old school. I believe that any scripture memorization should only be from the King James Version.


  • (Matthew 5:43 KJV) Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy.

  • (Matthew 5:44 KJV) But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you;

  • My comments: This is probably one of the most difficult teachings to follow. I can understand and follow the last part about praying for them, but I have a difficult time with the first part of loving them.

    November 27, 2006
    Memory Verse: Matthew 5:3-10

    Currently I’m reading Matthew, the first book of the New Testament. I’ll be posting a verse or series of verses that I find worthy of memorization. While many people use various translations, I’m from the old school. I believe that any scripture memorization should only be from the King James Version.


  • Matthew 5:3 KJV) Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

  • (Matthew 5:4 KJV) Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
  • (Matthew 5:5 KJV) Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.
  • (Matthew 5:6 KJV) Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.
  • (Matthew 5:7 KJV) Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
  • (Matthew 5:8 KJV) Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.
  • (Matthew 5:9 KJV) Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.
  • (Matthew 5:10 KJV) Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

  • Concerns Regarding Bible College

    I’ve sat down and thought about the concerns I have about going to bible college in the spring of 2007.

    CONCERNS:

    1. I haven’t been in college or grad school, but for a year and a half, since 1971. That’s 36 years ago.

    2. At age 57, I’m tired every night.

    3. Once I get home, I’m done for the day. I rarely go back out at night.

    4. Many of my fellow students will be much younger than I and have more energy and learning power.

    5. Most, if not all, of my fellow students have been regular church goers all of their life. They have attended bible studies for years and have read and know the bible. I will be at a tremendous disadvantage.

    6. Due to work and family obligations, I will have a difficulty finding the time to go to school, complete the assignments, and retain the information. (This is a concern for everyone.)

    7. My desire might dwindle and I might loose interested in a structured setting.

    8. As a member of the Masonic Fraternity, I am aware that many religions frown on such organizations. The baptist church is one of these organizations along with the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. I will not take off my Masonic ring or belt buckle and hide my membership. I won’t throw it in anyone’s face, but I won’t lie about it either. Before I joined Bethany Lane Baptist Church in the mid 1990’s, I made the Pastor aware of my membership and told him if it was going to be a problem to let me know up front and I wouldn’t join. He said there would be no problem as long as I didn’t use the church as a recruiting ground for the Masons. I just hope there aren’t other students, faculty, or staff, that want to make this an issue. If this happens, I won’t attend. I’m as firm in my beliefs of the Masonic Fraternity as I am in the bible. I see no problems. I’ve read the various anti-Masonic books and articles and know these people are far off base. I will never denounce either the fraternity, God, or the bible. If others have a problem with this, it will be their problem, as I have no intention of arguing my case. I’m there to learn the bible and religion, not argue about the Masonic fraternity. If you don’t want me there, just say it and I will leave. I’m not looking for a confrontation on the issue.

    9. In the past, I’ve been easily sidetracked from various things, always getting involved with different projects requiring quite a bit of time. Items such as writing, website, blog, and genealogy, could easily distracted me. I must keep very focused on the task at hand. This will involve spending much less time on the computer and much more time reading and studying. I have to make major changes in my life in this respect and also with gathering the energy needed.

    I view the last item (along with items #2 & #3) as being my biggest hurdles.

    ADVANTAGES:

    1. I will study and learn more about the bible than I ever have before. It will give me a better understanding of the word of God.

    Somehow the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages. I’m looking forward to starting bible college in January. Praying for strength, knowledge, and everyone’s support is important in this matter.

    Memory Verse: Matthew 17:20

    Ted Armstrong, a frequent visitor and commenter on this (and my other) blogs, left a comment on a previous entry asking what my bible said about Matthew 17:20.

    I thought this might be a good test for eSword. Below is Matthew 17:20, from several different bible translations:

    Mat 17:20

    (ALT) So Jesus said to them, “Because of your unbelief. For positively I say to you, if you are having faith like a grain of mustard [or, a mustard seed], you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here [to] there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible to you*.

    (ASV) And he saith unto them, Because of your little faith: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.

    (Bishops) Iesus sayde vnto them: because of your vnbeliefe. For veryly I say vnto you: If ye haue fayth as a grayne of mustarde seede, ye shall say vnto this mountayne: remoue hence to yonder place, and it shall remoue, neither shall any thyng be vnpossible vnto you.

    (CEV) Jesus replied: It is because you don’t have enough faith! But I can promise you this. If you had faith no larger than a mustard seed, you could tell this mountain to move from here to there. And it would. Everything would be possible for you.

    (Complete Apostles’ Bible) So Jesus said to them, “Because of your unbelief; for assuredly I say to you, if you have faith like a mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, ‘Be moved from here to there,’ and it shall move; and nothing shall be impossible for you.

    (DRB) (17:19) Jesus said to them: Because of your unbelief. For, amen I say to you, if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain: Remove from hence hither, and it shall remove: and nothing shall be impossible to you.

    (EMTV) So Jesus said to them, “Because of your unbelief; for assuredly I say to you, if you have faith like a mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, ‘Be moved from here to there,’ and it shall move; and nothing shall be impossible for you.

    (ESV) He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.”

    (Geneva) And Iesus said vnto them, Because of your vnbeliefe: for verely I say vnto you, if ye haue faith as much as is a graine of mustarde seede, ye shall say vnto this mountaine, Remooue hence to yonder place, and it shall remoue: and nothing shalbe vnpossible vnto you.

    (GNB) “It was because you do not have enough faith,” answered Jesus. “I assure you that if you have faith as big as a mustard seed, you can say to this hill, ‘Go from here to there!’ and it will go. You could do anything!”

    (GW) He told them, “Because you have so little faith. I can guarantee this truth: If your faith is the size of a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you.”

    (ISV) He told them, “Because of your lack of faith. For truly I tell you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.

    (KJV) And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.

    (KJV-1611) And Iesus said vnto them, Because of your vnbeliefe: for verily I say vnto you, If yee haue faith as a graine of mustard seed, yee shall say vnto this mountaine; Remoue hence to yonder place: and it shall remoue, and nothing shall be vnpossible vnto you.

    (KJVA) And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.

    (KJVR) And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.

    (LITV) And Jesus said to them, Because of your unbelief. For truly I say to you, If you have faith as a grain of mustard, you will say to this mountain, Move from here to there! And it will move. And nothing shall be impossible to you.

    (MKJV) And Jesus said to them, Because of your unbelief. For truly I say to you, If you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, Move from here to there. And it shall move. And nothing shall be impossible to you.

    (MSG) “Because you’re not yet taking God seriously,” said Jesus. “The simple truth is that if you had a mere kernel of faith, a poppy seed, say, you would tell this mountain, ‘Move!’ and it would move. There is nothing you wouldn’t be able to tackle.”

    (Murdock) Jesus said to them: Because of your unbelief. For verily I say to you, That if there be in you faith like a grain of mustard seed, ye may say to this mountain, Remove hence, and it will remove: and nothing will be too hard for you.

    (NET) He told them, “It was because of your little faith. I tell you the truth,36 if you have faith the size of37 a mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; nothing38 will be impossible for you.”39

    (RSV) He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; and nothing will be impossible to you.”

    (Webster) And Jesus said to them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say to you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard-seed, ye shall say to this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place, and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible to you.

    (WNT) “Because your faith is so small,” He replied; “for I solemnly declare to you that if you have faith like a mustard-seed, you shall say to this mountain, ‘Remove from this place to that,’ and it will remove; and nothing shall be impossible to you.

    Below, are several commentaries of the verse, as taken from different sources:

    Barnes:
    Mat 17:20 –
    As a grain of mustard-seed – See the notes at Mat_13:31-32. The mustard-seed was the smallest of all seeds. It has been supposed by some, therefore, that he meant to say, If you have the smallest or feeblest faith that is genuine, you can do all things. The mustard-seed produced the largest of all herbs. It has been supposed by others, therefore, to mean, If you have increasing, expanding, enlarged faith, growing and strengthening from small beginnings, you can perform the most difficult undertaking. There is a principle of vitality in the grain of seed stretching forward to great results, which illustrates the nature of faith. Your faith should be like that. This is probably the true meaning.

    Ye shall say unto this mountain … – Probably he pointed to a mountain near, to assure them that if they had such faith they might accomplish the most difficult undertakings – things that at first would appear impossible.

    Clarke:
    Mat 17:20 –
    Because of your unbelief – Are we preachers of the Gospel? Do the things of God rest upon our minds with a deep and steady conviction? Can we expect that a doctrine which we do not, from conviction, credit ourselves, can be instrumental in our hands of begetting faith in others? So we preached, end so ye believed. The word preached generally begets in the people the same spirit which the preacher possesses. Instead of απιϚιαν, unbelief, the famous Vatican MS. and Cod. Cyprius, six others, Coptic, Ethiopic, Armenian, and Arabic, Origen, and Chrysostom, read ολιγοπιϚιαν, littleness of faith. The disciples had some faith, but not enough – they believed, but not fully.

    As a grain of mustard seed – Some eminent critics think this a proverbial expression, intimating a Great Degree of faith, because removing mountains, which St. Paul, 1Co_13:2, attributes to All Faith; i.e. the greatest possible degree of faith, is attributed here, by our Lord, to that faith which is as a grain of mustard seed. However this may be, there can be no doubt that our Lord means, as Bishop Pearce well remarks, a thriving and increasing faith; which like the grain of mustard seed, from being the least of seeds, becomes the greatest of all herbs; even a tree in whose branches the fowls of the air take shelter. See Wakefield’s Comment, and the note on Mat_13:32 (note).

    Gill:
    Mat 17:20 – And Jesus said unto them, because of your unbelief,…. The Arabic and Ethiopic versions read, “because of your little faith”, or “the smallness of your faith”; and so does one Greek manuscript; and which is what is doubtless meant by their unbelief; for they were not altogether destitute of faith, but their faith was very low, and their unbelief very great. Christ says, not because of the unbelief of the parent of the child, and those that were with him, though that also was a reason; but because of their unbelief, being willing to convince them of their unbelief, as he had done the father of the child, who had confessed it, and desired it might be removed from him: but lest they should think they had lost their power of doing miracles, Christ adds;

    for verily I say unto you, if ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed; which was a very small seed, the least of all seeds, and is used very often proverbially by the Jews, to signify anything of a small quantity or weight (b), and is sometimes used of faith, as here; so speaking of the congregation of Edom, meaning the Christians, they (c) say,

    “they have not אמונה כמו גרעין של חרדל, “faith as a grain of mustard seed”.”

    And it is used in like sense in other eastern nations; and by Mahomet in his Alcoran (d), who says,

    “We will appoint just balances in the day of resurrection, neither shall any soul be injured at all, although the merit or guilt of an action be of the weight of “a grain of mustard seed”.”

    So that it has no reference to the quality of mustard seed, being hot and acrimonious; which has led some interpreters wrong, to compare faith unto it, for its liveliness and fervency: when our Lord only means, that if his apostles had ever so small a degree of faith in exercise, which might be compared for its smallness to this least of seeds, such an effect as he after mentions would follow; and which therefore is to be understood, not of an historical faith, by which men assent to all that is in the Bible as true; nor of a special, spiritual faith, by which souls believe in Christ, as their Saviour and Redeemer; for of neither of these can the following things in common be said; but of a faith of miracles, peculiar to certain persons in those early times, for certain reasons; which such as had but ever so small a degree of, as the apostles here spoken to might say, as Christ observes to them,

    ye shall say to this mountain; pointing perhaps to that he was just come down from, which might be in sight of the house where he was,

    remove hence to yonder place, and it shall remove: meaning, not that it would be ordinarily or ever done in a literal sense by the apostles, that they should remove mountains; but that they should be able to do things equally difficult, and as seemingly impossible, if they had but faith, when the glory of God, and the good of men, required it. So that it does not follow, because the apostles did not do it in a literal sense, therefore they could not, as the Jew insultingly says (e); since it was meant that they should, and besides, have done, things equally as great as this, and which is the sense of the words. So the apostle expresses the faith of miracles, by “removing mountains”, 1Co_13:2 i.e. by doing things which are difficult, seem impossible to be done: wherefore Christ adds,

    and nothing shall be impossible to you; you shall not only be able to perform such a wonderful action as this, were it necessary, but any, and everything else, that will make for the glory of God, the enlargement of my kingdom and interest, the confirmation of truth, and the good of mankind.

    Wesley:
    Mat 17:20 – Because of your unbelief – Because in this particular they had not faith. If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed – That is, the least measure of it. But it is certain, the faith which is here spoken of does not always imply saving faith. Many have had it who thereby cast out devils, and yet will at last have their portion with them. It is only a supernatural persuasion given a man, that God will work thus by him at that hour. Now, though I have all this faith so as to remove mountains, yet if I have not the faith which worketh by love, I am nothing. To remove mountains was a proverbial phrase among the Jews, and is still retained in their writings, to express a thing which is very difficult, and to appearance impossible. Mat_21:21; Luk_17:6.

    School Nights

    There is one thing I forgot to mention about my visit to Arlington Bible College.

    I left my house about 5 PM and didn’t get to the college until about 5:50.

    Traffic on the Baltimore beltway was horrible.

    If I leave work at 4 PM, I get home about 4:45 or so. I ride with another employee in MIS. If it is the week I’m driving, I don’t get home until about 5 PM.

    Obviously, on school nights, I won’t be car pooling, nor returning straight home. I’ll just head straight to the college and pick up a bite to eat along the way.

    Perhaps I’ll take an extra sandwich and thermos of coffee with me. I wonder if the coffee will stay warm for 12 hours?

    I believe the Dean arrives about 4 PM each evening. I could get there about 4:40 and spend about an hour in the library studying or talking to the staff. There’s a lot I could be learning during that time.

    Also, I wonder if it would be worthwhile to take my laptop to class. I really didn’t see any need for it on the class I sat in on, on Monday. But, I could always use it when in the library.

    Matthew 17:20 – E.M. Bounds – Prayer

    Matthew 17:20
    Ted Armstrong, a frequent visitor and commenter on this (and my other) blogs, left a comment on a previous entry asking what my bible said about Matthew 17:20.
    I thought this might be a good test for eSword. Below is Matthew 17:20, from several different bible translations:
    Mat 17:20
    (ALT) So Jesus said to them, “Because of your unbelief. For positively I say to you, if you are having faith like a grain of mustard [or, a mustard seed], you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here [to] there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible to you*.
    (ASV) And he saith unto them, Because of your little faith: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.
    (Bishops) Iesus sayde vnto them: because of your vnbeliefe. For veryly I say vnto you: If ye haue fayth as a grayne of mustarde seede, ye shall say vnto this mountayne: remoue hence to yonder place, and it shall remoue, neither shall any thyng be vnpossible vnto you.
    (CEV) Jesus replied: It is because you don’t have enough faith! But I can promise you this. If you had faith no larger than a mustard seed, you could tell this mountain to move from here to there. And it would. Everything would be possible for you.
    (Complete Apostles’ Bible) So Jesus said to them, “Because of your unbelief; for assuredly I say to you, if you have faith like a mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, ‘Be moved from here to there,’ and it shall move; and nothing shall be impossible for you.
    (DRB) (17:19) Jesus said to them: Because of your unbelief. For, amen I say to you, if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain: Remove from hence hither, and it shall remove: and nothing shall be impossible to you.
    (EMTV) So Jesus said to them, “Because of your unbelief; for assuredly I say to you, if you have faith like a mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, ‘Be moved from here to there,’ and it shall move; and nothing shall be impossible for you.
    (ESV) He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.”
    (Geneva) And Iesus said vnto them, Because of your vnbeliefe: for verely I say vnto you, if ye haue faith as much as is a graine of mustarde seede, ye shall say vnto this mountaine, Remooue hence to yonder place, and it shall remoue: and nothing shalbe vnpossible vnto you.
    (GNB) “It was because you do not have enough faith,” answered Jesus. “I assure you that if you have faith as big as a mustard seed, you can say to this hill, ‘Go from here to there!’ and it will go. You could do anything!”
    (GW) He told them, “Because you have so little faith. I can guarantee this truth: If your faith is the size of a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you.”
    (ISV) He told them, “Because of your lack of faith. For truly I tell you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.
    (KJV) And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.
    (KJV-1611) And Iesus said vnto them, Because of your unbeliefe: for verily I say vnto you, If yee haue faith as a graine of mustard seed, yee shall say vnto this mountaine; Remoue hence to yonder place: and it shall remoue, and nothing shall be vnpossible vnto you.
    (KJVA) And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.
    (KJVR) And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.
    (LITV) And Jesus said to them, Because of your unbelief. For truly I say to you, If you have faith as a grain of mustard, you will say to this mountain, Move from here to there! And it will move. And nothing shall be impossible to you.
    (MKJV) And Jesus said to them, Because of your unbelief. For truly I say to you, If you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, Move from here to there. And it shall move. And nothing shall be impossible to you.
    (MSG) “Because you’re not yet taking God seriously,” said Jesus. “The simple truth is that if you had a mere kernel of faith, a poppy seed, say, you would tell this mountain, ‘Move!’ and it would move. There is nothing you wouldn’t be able to tackle.”
    (Murdock) Jesus said to them: Because of your unbelief. For verily I say to you, That if there be in you faith like a grain of mustard seed, ye may say to this mountain, Remove hence, and it will remove: and nothing will be too hard for you.
    (NET) He told them, “It was because of your little faith. I tell you the truth,36 if you have faith the size of37 a mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; nothing38 will be impossible for you.”39
    (RSV) He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; and nothing will be impossible to you.”
    (Webster) And Jesus said to them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say to you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard-seed, ye shall say to this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place, and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible to you.
    (WNT) “Because your faith is so small,” He replied; “for I solemnly declare to you that if you have faith like a mustard-seed, you shall say to this mountain, ‘Remove from this place to that,’ and it will remove; and nothing shall be impossible to you.
    Below, are several commentaries of the verse, as taken from different sources:
    Barnes:
    Mat 17:20 –
    As a grain of mustard-seed – See the notes at Mat_13:31-32. The mustard-seed was the smallest of all seeds. It has been supposed by some, therefore, that he meant to say, If you have the smallest or feeblest faith that is genuine, you can do all things. The mustard-seed produced the largest of all herbs. It has been supposed by others, therefore, to mean, If you have increasing, expanding, enlarged faith, growing and strengthening from small beginnings, you can perform the most difficult undertaking. There is a principle of vitality in the grain of seed stretching forward to great results, which illustrates the nature of faith. Your faith should be like that. This is probably the true meaning.
    Ye shall say unto this mountain … – Probably he pointed to a mountain near, to assure them that if they had such faith they might accomplish the most difficult undertakings – things that at first would appear impossible.
    Clarke:
    Mat 17:20 –
    Because of your unbelief – Are we preachers of the Gospel? Do the things of God rest upon our minds with a deep and steady conviction? Can we expect that a doctrine which we do not, from conviction, credit ourselves, can be instrumental in our hands of begetting faith in others? So we preached, end so ye believed. The word preached generally begets in the people the same spirit which the preacher possesses. Instead of ???????, unbelief, the famous Vatican MS. and Cod. Cyprius, six others, Coptic, Ethiopic, Armenian, and Arabic, Origen, and Chrysostom, read ???????????, littleness of faith. The disciples had some faith, but not enough – they believed, but not fully.
    As a grain of mustard seed – Some eminent critics think this a proverbial expression, intimating a Great Degree of faith, because removing mountains, which St. Paul, 1Co_13:2, attributes to All Faith; i.e. the greatest possible degree of faith, is attributed here, by our Lord, to that faith which is as a grain of mustard seed. However this may be, there can be no doubt that our Lord means, as Bishop Pearce well remarks, a thriving and increasing faith; which like the grain of mustard seed, from being the least of seeds, becomes the greatest of all herbs; even a tree in whose branches the fowls of the air take shelter. See Wakefield’s Comment, and the note on Mat_13:32 (note).
    Gill:
    Mat 17:20 – And Jesus said unto them, because of your unbelief,…. The Arabic and Ethiopic versions read, “because of your little faith”, or “the smallness of your faith”; and so does one Greek manuscript; and which is what is doubtless meant by their unbelief; for they were not altogether destitute of faith, but their faith was very low, and their unbelief very great. Christ says, not because of the unbelief of the parent of the child, and those that were with him, though that also was a reason; but because of their unbelief, being willing to convince them of their unbelief, as he had done the father of the child, who had confessed it, and desired it might be removed from him: but lest they should think they had lost their power of doing miracles, Christ adds;
    for verily I say unto you, if ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed; which was a very small seed, the least of all seeds, and is used very often proverbially by the Jews, to signify anything of a small quantity or weight (b), and is sometimes used of faith, as here; so speaking of the congregation of Edom, meaning the Christians, they (c) say,
    “they have not ????? ??? ????? ?? ????, “faith as a grain of mustard seed”.”
    And it is used in like sense in other eastern nations; and by Mahomet in his Alcoran (d), who says,
    “We will appoint just balances in the day of resurrection, neither shall any soul be injured at all, although the merit or guilt of an action be of the weight of “a grain of mustard seed”.”
    So that it has no reference to the quality of mustard seed, being hot and acrimonious; which has led some interpreters wrong, to compare faith unto it, for its liveliness and fervency: when our Lord only means, that if his apostles had ever so small a degree of faith in exercise, which might be compared for its smallness to this least of seeds, such an effect as he after mentions would follow; and which therefore is to be understood, not of an historical faith, by which men assent to all that is in the Bible as true; nor of a special, spiritual faith, by which souls believe in Christ, as their Saviour and Redeemer; for of neither of these can the following things in common be said; but of a faith of miracles, peculiar to certain persons in those early times, for certain reasons; which such as had but ever so small a degree of, as the apostles here spoken to might say, as Christ observes to them,
    ye shall say to this mountain; pointing perhaps to that he was just come down from, which might be in sight of the house where he was,
    remove hence to yonder place, and it shall remove: meaning, not that it would be ordinarily or ever done in a literal sense by the apostles, that they should remove mountains; but that they should be able to do things equally difficult, and as seemingly impossible, if they had but faith, when the glory of God, and the good of men, required it. So that it does not follow, because the apostles did not do it in a literal sense, therefore they could not, as the Jew insultingly says (e); since it was meant that they should, and besides, have done, things equally as great as this, and which is the sense of the words. So the apostle expresses the faith of miracles, by “removing mountains”, 1Co_13:2 i.e. by doing things which are difficult, seem impossible to be done: wherefore Christ adds,
    and nothing shall be impossible to you; you shall not only be able to perform such a wonderful action as this, were it necessary, but any, and everything else, that will make for the glory of God, the enlargement of my kingdom and interest, the confirmation of truth, and the good of mankind.
    Wesley:
    Mat 17:20 – Because of your unbelief – Because in this particular they had not faith. If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed – That is, the least measure of it. But it is certain, the faith which is here spoken of does not always imply saving faith. Many have had it who thereby cast out devils, and yet will at last have their portion with them. It is only a supernatural persuasion given a man, that God will work thus by him at that hour. Now, though I have all this faith so as to remove mountains, yet if I have not the faith which worketh by love, I am nothing. To remove mountains was a proverbial phrase among the Jews, and is still retained in their writings, to express a thing which is very difficult, and to appearance impossible. Mat_21:21; Luk_17:6.

    Visit To Arlington Bible College

    MichaelBritton.jpgLast Monday evening I visited Arlington Bible College. I had a nice 45 minute visit with Donald Brooks, Dean of the college.

    Towards the end of the visit, Rev. Michael Britton came in the room. He was teaching Church History I on that evening. After the visit, I went to Rev. Britton’s classroom to sit in on the class. I must say I was quite impressed. There were about nine students in the class.

    Rev. Britton was very well prepared, doing the entire lecture with Power Point slides. There weren’t even personal computers the last time I was in college or grad school.

    He was covering the various Crusades. I didn’t know much about the Crusades and learned quite a bit. The textbook being used was ‘Christianity Through The Centuries’ by Earle E. Cairns.

    At the end of the class, Rev. Britton invited me back for next week. He is going to show a movie next week.

    One thing I was pleased to notice, from my various conversations with the staff, instructor, students, and chapel times, was that Arlington Bible College takes a conservative stance. I like that very much. I’m not a liberal in any area of my life.

    Rev. Britton also invited me to his church; however, it is quite a ways from my home. There is a baptist church near my home in Riveria Beach (Anne Arundel County) that I am considering visiting.

    I haven’t attended church since 1998, perferring to worship in my own way, in private. I like private meditation and prayer. I enjoy hearing a good sermon and lecture. I enjoy listening to Christian music. All of this can be obtained from TV, radio, or via the internet in mp3 format.

    The only thing missing is a congregation of people.

    Mat 6:6 But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.

    The ‘closet’ simply means a private place. You can certainly pray in public, but God also advocates private prayer. Prayer is worship. Therefore, from my way of thinking, you can also worship in private. Certainly, there is nothing wrong with public worship, just like there is nothing wrong with public prayer. I prefer private prayer and private worship.

    Eventually, I’ll probably return to a church. More than likely it will be a baptist church, or certainly one where the bible is strictly and conservatively taught.

    Men Of Intergrity.net

    Christianity Today.com has a decent website. On their website is a page labeled Men of Intregrity.net. This week’s theme is ‘Discover the More in Less’ (Comparing and coveting crowds out contentment.)

    Their prayer for the week is “Lord, keep me from accumulating things just to fill a void in my life that only You can fill.”

    That is so very true. I have seen this in my own life, many times. I’ve gone out of bought many things I really didn’t need. Somehow I thought that buying new things would make me feel better, but that wasn’t the case. ‘New things’ took up my time and kept me from taking on the problems at hand. I used them as a distraction; instead of facing problems.

    English Standard Version (ESV)

    Ted Armstrong posted on a recent comment that he prefered the English Standard Version translation of the bible.

    I really hadn’t had much exposure to this translation and decided to check it out.

    I’ve really only used the King James Version, New King James Version, NASB, and NIV versions. Of these the King James and New King James are my favorites. For generally reading the NIV is nice.

    The latest statistics (September, 2006) show the following bible sales:

    1 New International Version various publishers
    2 New King James Version various publishers
    3 King James Version various publishers
    4 New Living Translation Tyndale
    5 English Standard Version Crossway
    6 Reina Valera 1960 (Spanish) various publishers
    7 Holman Christian Standard Bible B&H Publishing Group
    8 New American Standard Bible update various publishers
    9 The Message Eugene Peterson, NavPress
    10 New International Readers Version Zondervan

    As you can see the NIV and New KJV lead the way. There’s no surprise there as both are very popular. I’ve seen the New Living Translation (#4) before and am not that impressed with it.

    However, #5, is Ted’s favorite – the ESV.

    From the ESV website:

    How is the ESV Different from Other Translations?
    All Bible translations seek to faithfully communicate God’s Word. But, depending on translation philosophy and purpose, significant differences are evident when comparing Bible translations.

    There are two main kinds of Bible translations. The first is commonly referred to as (1) ‘word-for-word’ (or ‘formal equivalence’) translation, the second as (2) ‘thought-for-thought’ (or ‘dynamic equivalence’) translation. The main difference between these two translation philosophies is that the first one places the primary emphasis on what the words of the original say and mean (in their context), while the second one places the primary emphasis on the main thought or idea in the phrases of the original.

    As an ‘essentially literal’ translation, the ESV is committed to the principle of ‘word-for’word’ translation, as the translation philosophy that most accurately conveys the Bible’s own understanding that ‘all Scripture is breathed out by God’ (2 Timothy 3:16), or as Jesus said, ‘Man shall not live by bread alone but by every word that comes from the mouth of God’ (Matthew 4:4).