St. Ignatius Loyola

Here is a wonderful prayer credited to St. Ignatius Loyola:
For Generous Service
Lord Jesus, teach me to be generous;
teach me to serve you as you deserve,
to give and not to count the cost,
to fight and not to heed the wounds,
to toil and not to seek for rest,
to labor and not to seek reward,
except that of knowing that I do your will.

St. Catherine of Genoa

Here is a wonder prayer which is credited to St. Catherine of Genoa:

My Gift is Myself
Lord, I make you a present of myself.
I do not know what to do with myself.
So let me make this exchange:
I will place myself entirely in your hands,
if you will cover my ugliness with your beauty,
and tame my unruliness with your love.
Put out the flames of false passion in my heart,
since these flames destroy
all that is true within me.
Make me always busy in your service.
Lord, I want no special signs from you,
nor am I looking for intense emotions
in response to your love. Amen.

St. Francis of Assisi Prayer

I found a nice painting of St. Francis of Assisi and made the graphic below:
StFrancisOfAssisiPrayer.jpg

A Franciscan Benediction

A Franciscan Benediction:
Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

May God bless us with discomfort at easy answers, half-truths, and superficial relationships, so that we may live deep within our hearts.
May God bless us with anger at injustice, oppression, and exploitation of people, so that we may work for justice, freedom and peace.
May God bless us with tears to shed for those who suffer from pain, rejection, starvation and war, so that we may reach out our hands to comfort them and turn their pain into joy.
And may God bless us with enough foolishness to believe that we can make a difference in this world, so that we can do what others claim cannot be done.
Amen.

Philip Yancy – “Prayer”

Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

I once heard a theologian remark that in the Gospels people approached Jesus with a question 183 times whereas he replied with a direct answer only three times. Instead, he responded with a different question, a story, or some other indirection. Evidently Jesus wants us to work out answers on our own, using the principles that he taught and live.
Prayer, I find, often operates the same way. In the difficult and sometimes frustrating act of pursuing God, changes occur in me that equip me to serve God. Maybe what I sense as abandonment is actually a form of empowerment.

Philip Yancy – “Prayer”

Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

Today life conspires against a regular, satisfying prayer time. Reading the classic devotional literature, I am struck by how much of it came from the pens of people who living in communities organized for that purpose (such as convents and monasteries) or from those who had servants to handle the time-consuming chores (they say nothing of the servants’ prayer lives). I find scant advice on prayer written by a mother of three teenagers or an excustive who puts in seventy-hour weeks at the office.
Add to modern hindrance the barrage of ‘noise’ in an information society – chat rooms, mobile phones, television, text messagings, iPods, BlackBerry Internet devices – and prayer simply gets drowned out.

Philip Yancy – “Prayer”

Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

Don Postema says, “I used to write in my daily calendar ‘7 – 7:30 a.m.: Prayer.’ But many times I passed that up. It was one more thing to pass by that day. Now I write ‘7 – 7:30 a.m.: God’ Somehow that’s a little harder to neglect.’ I have found that my reluctance to pray increases when I regard it as a necessary discipline and decrease when I see it as a time to keep company with God.

Philip Yancy – “Prayer”

Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

A person prays, sand Augstine, “That he himself may be constructed, not that God my be instructed.

Philip Yancy – “Prayer”

Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

Persistent prayer keeps brings God and me together, with several important benefits. As I pour out my sould to God, I get it off my chest, so to speak, unloading some of my burden to One who can handle it better. Little by little, as I get to know God I learn that God has nothing in common with an unjust judge or a stingy neighbor, though at times it may seem so. What I learn from spending time with God then better equips me to discern what God wants to do on earth, as well as my role in that plan.

Philip Yancy – “Prayer”

Here is the next passage of Philip Yancy’s book “Prayer” that I wanted to share:

Consider again the act of repentance. Confessing my sins before God communicates something God already knows. Yet somehow the act of confession binds the relationship and allows a closeness that could not otherwise exist.